bumblingb
rootandrock:

mythologicalmotherearth:

not-normal-people-here:

Serpopard
by  
CHRIS HAEJIN CHU

The serpopard is a term applied by some modern researchers to what is described as a mythical animal known from Ancient Egyptian depictions. This term is not used in any original texts, and is an interpretation made only recently. The image is featured specifically on decorated cosmetic palettes from the Pre-Dynastic Period. Examples include the Narmer Palette and the Small Palette of Nekhen.
The "serpopard" has been defined as a cross between a serpent and leopard and is supposed to feature the body of the latter and a long neck and head representing the former.
The image generally is classified as a feline, however, and with close inspection resembles an unusually long-necked lionesses instead. It bears the characteristic tuft of the species at the end of the tail, there are no spots, the round-eared head most closely resembles the lioness rather than a serpent because serpents do not have ears, and there are no typical serpent features such as scales, tongue, or head shape.
And we all know how  the Egyptians are good at depicting the creatures they observed.

Can’t help but notice a certain resemblance to the Mushushu from the “Ishtar Gate”

rootandrock:

mythologicalmotherearth:

not-normal-people-here:

Serpopard

by  

CHRIS HAEJIN CHU

The serpopard is a term applied by some modern researchers to what is described as a mythical animal known from Ancient Egyptian depictions. This term is not used in any original texts, and is an interpretation made only recently. The image is featured specifically on decorated cosmetic palettes from the Pre-Dynastic Period. Examples include the Narmer Palette and the Small Palette of Nekhen.

The "serpopard" has been defined as a cross between a serpent and leopard and is supposed to feature the body of the latter and a long neck and head representing the former.

The image generally is classified as a feline, however, and with close inspection resembles an unusually long-necked lionesses instead. It bears the characteristic tuft of the species at the end of the tail, there are no spots, the round-eared head most closely resembles the lioness rather than a serpent because serpents do not have ears, and there are no typical serpent features such as scales, tongue, or head shape.

And we all know how  the Egyptians are good at depicting the creatures they observed.

Can’t help but notice a certain resemblance to the Mushushu from the “Ishtar Gate”